Grain Terminal Of The Damned

One of the stranger features of Myrtle Edwards Park is that smack dab in the middle of it is a massive grain terminal.  Seattle may be full of industries like fishing and shipping, but for some reason, grain doesn’t seem like it fits with ever-damp Seattle.  Nonetheless, there it is.

Myrtle Edwards Park Grain Terminal

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I’m not going to get all specific about it’s world-class air scrubbing abilities or all the dual conveyer belt action enclosed within, but I do know that if you shoot it from the side, it looks pretty insane-assylum-like.  Good enough for me.  I’ve taken some other shots and panoramas from the side that show all the silos.  If people get interested or if I get desperate, maybe I’ll post more.

Seattle Comes Alive At Night

As you know, I went out to find the P.I. Globe before it ground to a halt.  Doing so means a little hike, but it wasn’t all for naught.  I got the picture I wanted and I also got a little something else:

The Eagle (sculpture) and Space Needle at night

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At first it seemed like everything was still.  I can’t say quiet, as you might notice the blur of a freight train through the bottom of the frame.  With a wide field of view, this also happens to cross the approach path for Seatac Airport.  I love the morse-code of dots and dashes the planes make through my frame and set the exposure up to 13 seconds to record it.  The foreground sculpture is called Eagle and was created by Alexander Calder in 1971.  It is the most recognizable piece of the Olympic Sculpture Park (or “the sculpture garden”, as most people would call it) and I was really happy to capture this shot of it with the most recognizable Seattle landmark in the background.

Industrial Intrusions in Seattle

Industrial Intrusions in Seattle

The north end of Myrtle Edwards Park in Seattle abuts one of the remaining industrial sites in the area. What is it? Some sort of silo and conveyor system. My friends and I speculate wheat and corn. We have no idea. I love the stark lines and the fact you can actually see some working industry right next to the biotechs and stoners on the waterfront.
  • ApertureValue: f/11
  • DateTimeOriginal: 2008:08:16 12:12:42
  • ExposureTime: 1/250 sec
  • Flash: No Flash
  • FocalLength: 24 mm
  • ISOSpeedRatings: 100
  • Model: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XT